Some law enforcement officers shun state’s new gun control law

Some law enforcement officers shun state’s new gun control law

Gun Rights

Contributed photo/Statesman-Examiner Stevens County Sheriff Brad Manke. by RaeLynn Ricarte Statesman-Examiner The number of Washington law enforcement and government leaders balking at upholding gun control measures approved by voters in November, is growing. Stevens County Sheriff Brad Manke said his deputies will not actively seek out violators unless there is an imminent threat to public safety. “I took an oath to defend the Constitution and uphold the laws of the state of Washington, so I don’t feel I can say I will not enforce a law under any circumstances,” he said. “However, it would have to be a pretty extreme circumstance for us to ever make a custodial arrest for a violation. “As a sheriff, you have a lot of discretion and I will say that we are going to respect the Second Amendment.” Initiative-1639 passed with more than 60 percent of the vote, with the majority of “yes” votes coming from heavily populated, more urban counties west of the Cascades, while voters on the east side of the state mostly gave it a thumbs down. The measure raises the minimum age for adults to buy a semi-automatic rifle from 18 to 21, redefines semi- automatic rifles as “assault rifles” and mandates safety classes for purchases. In addition, it requires firearms dealers to sell trigger locks and gun safes and prevents them from selling to out-of-state residents. The law would also make firearm owners criminally liable if their guns were involved in any criminal incidents, even if the weapons […]

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