State’s permit-to-carry law doesn’t violate 2nd amendment, Minnesota Supreme Court says

State's permit-to-carry law doesn't violate 2nd amendment, Minnesota Supreme Court says

Minnesota’s permit-to-carry law, which requires individuals to get a permit in order to legally carry a gun in public, does not violate the Second Amendment, the state’s Supreme Court says. The court, in an opinion published Wednesday morning , weighed in on a case brought by Nathan Hatch, who was charged with carrying a pistol in public without a permit. Hatch argued the state’s permit-to-carry law was unconstitutional and violated the Second Amendment because it is not “narrowly tailored.” The justices disagreed, writing of the law: “Indeed, it is hard to imagine a less restrictive firearm permitting scheme than the one provided by the permit-to-carry statute and its related provisions.” The Supreme Court, in its opinion, affirmed a decision from the state’s court of appeals to confirm Hatch’s conviction in the case. The justices point out how easy it is for an adult to obtain a permit. A law-abiding citizen, 21 or older, “need only show that they have passed a gun safety course and that they are not a danger to themselves or others,” the opinion reads. These “minimally burdensome requirements” are narrowly tailored, and serve the compelling governmental interest of ensuring public safety, it continues. “We therefore hold that the permit-to-carry statute does not violate the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution,” the opinion concludes. In 2020, there were 101,897 applications for a permit to carry submitted to sheriff’s offices, according to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension . A total of 96,554 permits were issued […]

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