Supreme Court Declines to Hear Case for D.C. Statehood

Supreme Court Declines to Hear Case for D.C. Statehood

The Supreme Court of the October 2021 term (Courtesy photo) The U.S. Supreme Court began the new term on Monday with an agenda that includes a variety of controversial issues from voter representation and gun rights to a woman’s access to abortion services. In one of its first actions on Monday, the justices chose not to interfere with a ruling of a lower court that said District residents don’t have the right to voting representation in the U.S. Congress. District residents serving as plaintiffs sued in federal court, arguing they have all of the obligations of U.S. citizenship but don’t have voting rights in either chamber of the U.S. Congress. Before the matter reached the Supreme Court, the U.S. District Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit both ruled against District residents. D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D) expressed her displeasure with the high court’s decision. “I am disappointed that the Supreme Court summarily affirmed a three-judge panel’s ruling that D.C. residents do not have the constitutional right to voting representation in the House,” Norton said. “However, the ruling has no bearing on the constitutionality of D.C. statehood, which would give D.C. residents voting representation in the House and Senate and full control over local affairs.” “In fact, the three-judge panel expressly referred to ‘statehood’ as a remedy for D.C. statehood. Thank you to the D.C. residents who served as plaintiffs and their pro bono attorneys for their efforts in this case,” she […]

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