Supreme Court rejects challenges to gun silencer laws days after Virginia Beach massacre

Supreme Court rejects challenges to gun silencer laws days after Virginia Beach massacre

Gun Rights

The Supreme Court on Monday rejected a request to take up a pair of cases challenging a federal law requiring the registration of gun silencers mere days after a gunman used one in a shooting rampage in Virginia Beach which left 12 people dead. The justices, in an order issued without comment or recorded dissent, said they would not take up the cases of two Kansas men challenging the National Firearms Act of 1934 after they were convicted for failing to register their gun silencers, firearm attachments designed to suppress the sound of a gunshot. The two men — Shane Cox and Jeremy Kettler — had separately appealed their convictions to the nation’s highest court and asked the justices to consider if gun silencers are protected under the Second Amendment. They argued that their constitutional right "to keep and bear arms" includes silencers. President Donald Trump reportedly asked the court to stay out of the case and leave the convictions in place. Cox, owner of "Tough Guys" army-surplus store, was convicted of manufacturing and selling unregistered silencers, while Kettler was convicted of possessing one. The two men were sentenced to one year of probation. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals had upheld both of their convictions last year, ruling that a silencer is not a "bearable" arm protected by the U.S. Constitution. The National Firearms Act requires individuals to register silencers and pay a federal tax of about $200 "upon the manufacture, importation or transfer of an NFA firearm." […]

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