Texas company is cleared to put designs for 3-D printed guns online

Texas company is cleared to put designs for 3-D printed guns online

They look futuristic, the type of firearms that would-be assassins use in movies: 3-D printed guns made of a hard plastic that are simple to assemble, easy to conceal and tough to trace. After spending years fighting the federal government for the right to do so, a Texas company was given the green light to post blueprints online showing people how to make 3-D printed guns from the comfort of their home. "There is a market for these guns and it’s not just among enthusiasts and hobbyists," said Nick Suplina, managing director for law and policy at Everytown for Gun Safety, one of the three groups that have gone to court. "There’s a real desire … in the criminal underworld as well." Wilson, the founder of Defense Distributed, first published downloadable designs for a 3-D printed firearm in 2013. It was downloaded about 100,000 times until the State Department ordered him to cease, contending it violated federal export laws since some of the blueprints were downloaded by people outside the United States. But in a reversal that stunned gun-control advocates, the State Department in late June settled its case against Wilson and agreed to allow him to resume posting the blueprints at the end of July. Wilson took to Twitter, declaring victory and proclaiming he would start back up on Aug. 1. Wilson did not return an email seeking comment. His attorney, Josh Blackman, a professor at the South Texas College of Law Houston, declined to comment. Gun industry […]

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