The entwined histories of guns and race in America

The entwined histories of guns and race in America

Second. By Carol Anderson. Bloomsbury; 272 pages; $ 28 and £ 18.99 Ah Black Even before the republic was founded, having a gun was a white American nightmare. Slave rebellions, black soldiers fighting in national wars, and even African-American drivers are all spurring fear and violence backed by white supremacist authority. Carol Anderson, in “The Second,” a compact yet radical history of guns and races in the United States, “holds and retains arms” is not about the abstract freedom to carry guns. Claims to have been. Its main role was “black exclusion and sneakyness”. Anderson writes that the Second Amendment to the Constitution was born out of sin. The word “slavery” does not appear in the Constitution. Racism is not explicitly stated in the Second Amendment to the Constitution. But she claims it was at the heart of the guarantee. When 55 representatives of the Constitutional Council, 25 of whom were slave owners, drafted an alternative to the Articles of Confederation in 1787, they knew that they needed the consent of the southern states. According to Anderson, the amendment was “a bribe to the South that took advantage of black rule.” Slave owners could be confident that they would arm themselves for fear of raising their suffering property. Other scholars have provided a more subtle explanation of the origin of the modification, but there is no doubt that its “well-regulated militia” had the brilliance of racial domination. It was reinforced by the Unified Militia Act of 1792, requiring white […]

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