The Kind of Justice Makes All the Difference

The Kind of Justice Makes All the Difference

Gun Rights

COMMENTARY BY Impartial judges interpret the law, such as the Constitution or statutes, as written and apply it without regard for which side wins or which interests might be advanced. Classen Rafael/EyeEm/Getty Images Political judges interpret the law as they want it to be and apply it with an eye toward which party might benefit or the impact of their decisions. “I think,” he said, “there’s no need for all the guns we have in the country and if I could get rid of one thing, it would be to get rid of that whole gun climate." "The Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern." In a recent interview with the Washington Post , retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, whose memoir is being released tomorrow, shows why the conflict over the kind of judge a president appoints is so important. President Richard Nixon appointed Stevens, who turned 99 last month, to the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1970 and, five years later, President Gerald Ford appointed him to the Supreme Court. The Senate confirmed him to both judicial positions without any opposition. Stevens is the third longest serving member of the Supreme Court in American history. Judges decide cases by interpreting and applying law to the facts and can best be evaluated by the process they follow in those tasks. Impartial judges interpret the law, […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.