The Other American Epidemic: Gun Violence

The Other American Epidemic: Gun Violence

Students marched through downtown Boston to protest gun laws and advocate for change. Photo: Daniel Peden/The Berkeley Beacon TW: This editorial contains mentions of gun violence, homicide, and suicide. Since the pandemic began, the U.S. has shifted much of its attention to improving public health. Despite this, an epidemic separate from the coronavirus has been plaguing the country for years prior—the gun violence crisis. In the month since the March 16 Atlanta shootings, there have been at least 45 mass shootings across the U.S., according to data from the Gun Violence Archive . The Gun Violence Archive defines a mass shooting as a shooting when four or more people have been shot or killed, not including the shooter. With that in mind, this year alone, the U.S. has averaged more than one mass shooting a day . This is unacceptable. Mass shootings have become so frequent, they’re hardly considered front page news among the many crises that pop up daily in the U.S. Some mass shootings remain unforgettable to the broader public because of the number of people killed—like Columbine, Newtown or Parkland. However, there are so many others that never receive the same level of attention. This month, on April 7, on Rock Hill, S.C. a former N.F.L. player shot and killed a doctor , the doctor’s wife and their two grandchildren inside their house, as well as two air-conditioning technicians who were working outside the home. ‘Thoughts and prayers’ from politicians have never worked, and it’s long […]

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