There are two constitutional amendments on KY ballots. Here’s what you need to know.

Stalked in 2000, WKYT-TV news anchor tells her story to support Marsy’s Law Jennifer Nime Palumbo, news anchor for WKYT-TV, opens up about her story of being stalked in 2000 by a man with a gun in an unidentified vehicle. She is sharing what happened to her in support of Marsy’s Law, a constitutional amendment that would By Marcus Dorsey captions and subtitles off, selected Jennifer Nime Palumbo, news anchor for WKYT-TV, opens up about her story of being stalked in 2000 by a man with a gun in an unidentified vehicle. She is sharing what happened to her in support of Marsy’s Law, a constitutional amendment that would By Marcus Dorsey Kentucky voters face two constitutional amendments on the Nov. 3 ballot. Two long, densely worded constitutional amendments. There is a reason for all that verbiage. Last year, the Kentucky Supreme Court struck down a 2018 voter-approved constitutional amendment known as “Marsy’s Law” that would have established roughly a dozen rights for crime victims in state courts. The court unanimously ruled that the entire 556-word amendment should have been presented on the ballot, rather than a brief question simply asking voters if they agreed that crime victims should be treated with “dignity and respect.” Sign up for the PM Newsletter and get the day’s biggest stories in your inbox. The Kentucky Constitution does not allow for a terse summary of proposed amendments, the court said. “The meaning of the phrase ‘such proposed amendment or amendments shall be submitted […]

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