This absurd notion of absolutism

This absurd notion of absolutism

Rep. Lauren Bobert of Colorado likes to shoot from the lip. She has called President Biden and anyone who agrees with him on firearms restrictions a “tyrant.” “The Second Amendment is absolute,” Bobert posted. “Anyone who says otherwise is a tyrant.” The president is no tyrant, and neither are other people who espouse modest restrictions on gun ownership and use. Bobert is absolutely wrong. So are folks who agree whole-heartedly with her statement, many of them well-intentioned supporters of the everyday person’s gun rights, but who mistakenly see any and all attempts to leven those rights as a road leading to total abolition. The Second Amendment, like the First Amendment or any other amendment, is NOT absolute. Isn’t now, never has been, and probably never will be. My column isn’t an argument so much for Biden’s plan, including a ban on ghost guns and pistol-stabilizing braces, or a directive for a “red flag” law that would temporarily block potential threats from possessing guns. No, it’s about this absurd notion of absolutism. Regarding guns for sure. But also pertaining to a lot of other laws. Part of the U.S. Supreme Court’s job description is to determine the constitutionality of laws. The Court has held that any law restricting SOME rights must have an especially strong purpose and be narrowly targeted. Particularly the Bill of Rights. However, government has always had the ability to limit a person’s freedom under certain circumstances. Let’s start with my favorite amendment, the First Amendment. As […]

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