Void FOID? State’s top court asked to decide if it’s time to shoot down Firearm Owner Identification cards

Void FOID? State’s top court asked to decide if it’s time to shoot down Firearm Owner Identification cards

Guns on display at Kee Firearms and Training in New Lenox in January. SPRINGFIELD — For more than half a century, anyone in Illinois who wanted to own a gun needed to first apply for a special state identification card. But now the state’s top court is being asked to decide whether the Firearm Owner’s Identification cards — popularly called FOID cards — are a necessary safeguard or a violation of the U.S. Constitution. Last week, a downstate judge ruled the FOID card system was unconstitutional, reducing residents’ Second Amendment rights to bear arms to a “façade.” Gun control advocates denounced the ruling as “frightening and radical,” and Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul quickly appealed the decision to the Illinois Supreme Court. The appeal filed last Thursday sets up a battle over whether the state can require its citizens to hold such an ID card in order to own a firearm. First enacted in 1968, the state’s Firearm Owner Identification Act requires Illinoisans to apply for the card with the Illinois State Police in order to legally own a firearm. But in his ruling Tuesday, White County Judge T. Scott Webb wrote that the FOID card “makes criminals out of law abiding citizens who are attempting to protect their lives within their homes.” “A citizen in the State of Illinois is not born with a Second Amendment right. Nor does that right insure when a citizen turns 18 or 21 years of age. It is a facade,” wrote White. […]

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