Voting reform framed as simple fix, or confusing thicket

Voting reform framed as simple fix, or confusing thicket

Hide caption Lee Goodman, an attorney who previously challenged Maine’s ranked choice voting system and is now work with the campaign opposing a similar proposal in Massachusetts, said during a virtual debate Thursday that the model “introduces many downsides” into elections. [Screenshot] By Chris Lisinski / State House News Service BOSTON — The ranked-choice election system that Massachusetts voters will decide whether to embrace is, depending on which side of the issue you ask, either a simple fix to a stifling status quo or a confusing thicket of steps that elevates fringe voices. As opponents of the Nov. 3 ballot question prepare to launch their campaign, one of the proposal’s lead backers and an attorney who fought a similar effort in Maine made their pitches at a virtual forum Thursday. On the line is a massive overhaul of way elections are decided, one that supporters say is particularly relevant in the wake of two Congressional primary elections where the winner in a crowded Democratic field did not surpass even a quarter of votes cast. “We’re tired of zero-sum politics,” said Evan Falchuk, board chair of the Yes on 2 campaign. “We’re tired of a lack of choices, we’re tired of spoilers and split votes and voting in fear. We’re tired of politicians ignoring us if we’re not part of their base. We want consensus. We want our voices to be heard. We want new choices, new ideas and new voices, and we’re working hard to make these things into […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.