WESTFALL: Gunfight: Extremism or commonsense reform

WESTFALL: Gunfight: Extremism or commonsense reform

Ryan Busse grew up on a ranch/farm just east of Bird City, Kansas. As a youngster, he did all the traditional ranching chores — baling hay, feeding animals, and the like — but his favorite part of country living was his love of the wild places, where large mule deer lived, and pheasants flushed with unpredictable regularity. Ryan was the consummate hunter and as he grew up, he often found himself thinking about how he could have a career that included lots of shooting and time in nature. Subsequent to college, Ryan was able to get in on the ground floor of the Kimber gun company. A fledgling company that was dedicated to making high quality rifles (and ultimately, high quality handguns) was the perfect fit for Busse. He quickly became a rising star in the gun industry, selling literally hundreds of thousands of guns. On several occasions he was given awards by the industry for his productivity and the influence he exerted relative to the 2nd Amendment of the Constitution. In the ensuing years, however, Busse, a champion of conservation, began to realize that the industry of which he was a part was much less interested in preserving public ground for hunting and fishing, and much more interested in selling guns — at any price. “Gunfight,” Busse’s first book published by Hachette Book in New York and recently released, is a largely autobiographical glimpse into the world of guns, the men and women that sold them, and the […]

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