Wilson: Black gun owners can feel unwelcome in white shooting ranges, so they created their own in Denver

Wilson: Black gun owners can feel unwelcome in white shooting ranges, so they created their own in Denver

Anubis Heru, lead instructor, instructs a student on sight alignment to help with accuracy using a simulated dry fire pistol at the 1770 Armory and Gun Club. (Glenn Payne, Special to The Colorado Sun) Behind the walls of an unassuming building in Denver’s historic Five Points neighborhood, a cultural shift is taking hold in the Black community. Gun owners and novice shooters are stepping inside the 1770 Armory and Gun Club to learn about their weapons, pick up some Black history and practice shooting — without firing a shot. Theo Wilson Racial tensions rose during President Donald Trump’s time in office, and Black gun ownership rose to record highs . But shooting spaces are sometimes owned by those who drove Blacks to buy guns in the first place. Traditionally, Second Amendment culture is overwhelmingly white, male and conservative, and many Black shooters can feel unwelcome. A Virginia shooting range, The Smoking Gun, got in hot water last year for explicitly saying Black Lives Matter supporters were not welcome to shoot at their range. On the streets, there’s long been a disparity in the treatment of Blacks who open carry vs. whites. That’s led to the creation of spaces where Black shooters can feel safe while training for firearm safety. The 1770 Armory and Gun Club opened last fall . Anubis Heru, lead instructor for 1770 Armory and Gun Club, helps Ken Lacanilao with sight alignment for pistol during live fire community practice. (Glenn Payne, Special to The Colorado Sun) […]

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